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If government wants to stop smuggling, then it should embrace XLOG technology

The country’s Bureau of Customs is leaking like a sieve, which explains why until now, smuggling of illegal drugs hasn’t abated. Shabu that is being sold on the streets of the archipelago are manufactured in China. There are no shabu laboratories in the country anymore. Several shipments worth billions of pesos have been intercepted, but this represents only a fraction of the shabu coming into the country. This leaves me wondering if President Duterte is raising his hands in surrender in the face of this pipeline of shabu flowing right under the noses of our customs bureau. Or put another way, it raises questions on whether the government even wants to stop smuggling of shabu.

This is rather tragic because putting a stop to smuggling could have been accomplished as early as the first quarter of 2018 with software developed by Filipino IT experts. Called “XLOG”, the software has been tested and retested, and consistently proved that the leaks in the system could be plugged permanently. It basically removes human intervention in the entire process, and with it, the opportunities for corruption.

If put to use by our Bureau of Customs, XLOG can eliminate delays in getting cargoes processed and released, and ensure that the government collects the right tariffs. What more can the government ask for? It will make exporters and importers happy, get rid of corruption, and increase collections. It’s a simple formula and it’s hard to understand why Customs officials refuse to embrace the technology.

On top of the crystal clear benefits it will bring to the government, XLOG is not even to cost the Bureau of Customs a single centavo. It is being offered entirely for free. All it needs to do is accept the technology, install the application at all ports of entry, and government will reap the rewards in one smooth movement. The technology has been proven effective in plugging the leaks in the present set-up. Government cannot possibly find a better solution to the smuggling problem and the corruption issue.

Of course, once in place, XLOG will eliminate corruption, which is perhaps the reason why there is resistance in the Bureau of Customs. No matter how many shake-ups will be carried out, the corruption will continue to plague the agency, for as long as officials are given broad discretion on letting a cargo shipment go through its checkpoints. Money, especially when it involves millions of pesos for a single transaction, can dilute the strongest of principles among officials.

Hence, we can only watch with despair as more and more smuggling take place on a daily basis at our ports of entry, both for sea and air cargo. We are losing the war, and government has only itself to blame. If Customs chief Isidro Lapena wants to change the situation, all he needs to do is get XLOG to come into the picture. It’s been waiting there on the sidelines. The picture can change in an instant: smuggling can be eliminated once the buttons for XLOG are pressed.

 

 

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Armed to the teeth

Back when drug lords were still demi-gods in Iloilo City, pictures of goons under their payroll were often posted on social media to boast about their power and closeness to political leaders.

barangay-monica-boys

Iloilo narco politicians, cops, now on the iron sights of the PNP?

All of a sudden, barangay captains in Iloilo City who have been linked to illegal drugs are fearing for their lives. That’s because one of them, Bakhaw punong barangay Remia Prevendido-Gregori, was shot dead in cold blood at a beach resort she owns in San Joaquin, Iloilo last June 24.

The following morning, police raided several homes in barangay Tanza Esperanza, including that of outgoing barangay captain Noel “Nene” Odicta. The barangay captain is the younger brother of Melvin “Boyet” Odicta, also known as “Dragon”, who was killed along with his wife, Meriam, in August 2016. Kapitan Nene was arrested after the police reportedly recovered a hand grenade and a cal. 45 pistol in the premises of his house. But his brother-in-law, Andrew Altas, was shot dead by the police after he allegedly fired at the lead elements of the SWAT who barged into his home.

Then, on Tuesday afternoon, June 26, a policeman driving home from work was ambushed by two gunmen riding a motorcycle in Barangay Dulonan, Arevalo District. Luckily, PO1 Dorben Acap was not fatally hit in the first burst of gunfire and managed to draw his 9mm pistol and return fire. As witnesses described it, it was almost like watching a movie, except that the bullets that flew thick that afternoon were real. Firing under the cover of his car, Acap managed to hit one of the gunmen, who fell to the ground. This forced his companion to help him get back on his feet and board the motorcycle to flee.

Shortly after the incident, a wounded policeman was taken aboard a tricycle to the Western Visayas Medical Center in Mandurriao. PO3 Melvin Mocoro was hit in the chest and foot, and although police investigators won’t admit it yet, is believed to have been wounded in the exchange of fire with Acap.

But this incident was immediately linked to the murder of Barangay Captain Remia Gregori and the raid on the compound of the Odictas after it was revealed that Acap is considered an HVT — high-value target — in the illegal drugs war. That his perceived assailant (there’s no proof yet that it was Mocoro who had shot Acap) was a police officer triggered inconsistent statements from the police. Radio commentators suspect it’s an attempt to cover up the involvement of a police officer in an apparent drug rub-out.

Even as the police tried to downplay any connection between the three incidents, what is now seen as a pattern of extermination of narco-politicians has caused worry among family and friends of another Barangay Captain, Keith “Dabing” Espinosa, of Monica-Blumentritt. Dabing is the wife of Jing Jing Espinosa, alleged right hand man of the slain “Dragon”, who is now serving an 8-year prison sentence for shooting and wounding a neighbor in his barangay.

On Wednesday, Dabing’s supporters started to hold prayer vigils around her home in an effort to prevent a similar attack as what befell Kapitan Gregori. Reporters from Aksyon Radyo Iloilo who went to her house said she wasn’t around when they knocked at her door. It’s highly possible she’s now in hiding for fear of her safety.

What’s more intriguing is that this wave of violence against known illegal drugs targets came after President Rodrigo Duterte visited Iloilo City for the first time since he assumed the highest post of the Republic two years ago. Did President Duterte give specific instructions to eradicate the remnants of the drug syndicates that led him to brand Iloilo City as the “bedrock of illegal drugs”? Or did his expression of displeasure about narco-politicians still being re-elected during the recent barangay elections force the PNP to use physical force, rather than the rule of law, to step up the campaign against drugs?

Which side are we on?

I am confused.
When Iloilo City was hit by a spate of murders by gunmen riding-in-tandem, apparently upon orders of drug syndicates and their corrupt protectors, there was no outcry.
I was even sued by Jed Patrick Mabilog for libel for labelling him as a crime protector.
And now La Salle and Ateneo communities are being agitated to wear black to protest the so-called extra judicial killings!
Which side are we on?
I know there are vigilante killings. But these have been going on for decades now. It’s not as if Duterte gave birth to it.
But most of the deaths in the war against illegal drugs resulted from legitimate operations.
To prove that legitimacy, we just need to count the number of PNP and PDEA agents who have died in the line of fire.
Those guys who continue to peddle shabu and other illicit drugs are desperate. They will kill to keep on with their trade. They know the authorities are hot on their trail, and they will do business armed and dangerous.
The Duterte administration should not relent on its war against illegal drugs. It must keep up the momentum. This is a fight to the finish.

Questions raised on ‘delay’ in prison sentence execution vs Jing Jing Espinosa

A prominent lawyer in Iloilo City has expressed surprise, and disbelief, that a prison sentence imposed on Jesus “Jing Jing” Espinosa Jr. was not immediately carried out after the Regional Trial Court Branch 31 received a Resolution from the Supreme Court upholding his conviction for frustrated murder four years ago.

Atty. Eldrid Antiquera, a former Iloilo City Councilor and legal assistant of the late Raul M. Gonzalez when he served as Justice Secretary, told Aksyon Radyo Iloilo that the circumstances that caused the delayed execution of the jail sentence should be investigated to make sure there was no hanky-panky.

“The Supreme Court takes these things seriously, because such negligence can thwart the course of justice,” Antiquera said. In many cases, court officials found to have been remiss in their duties have been suspended for similar omissions, he added.

Rosenia Jover, OIC Clerk of Court of Branch 31, issued a notice of hearing to both the prosecution and the defense lawyer, as well as the bail bond companies, on Tuesday, October 4, 2016, to tackle the revocation of the P200,000 bail bond for Espinosa.

Another court official told me that the revocation of the bail bond is the first step toward the issuance of a warrant of arrest to put Espinosa behind bars and begin serving his prison sentence.

notice-of-hearing

NOTICE OF HEARING ON THE REVOCATION OF BAIL BOND SET FOR OCT. 4, 2016. (Photo credit: RMN 774)

Espinosa, also known as “Bondying” in the order of battle of the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA), was found guilty as an accomplice for frustrated murder when he and two others shot and wounded Mark Serra in Barangay Monica on November 24, 2002.

Espinosa was able to submit a paraffin test report showing that he was negative for nitrate powder burns during his trial and was meted out a lighter sentence of six months and one day of prision correccional as minimum to eight years and one day as prision mayor as maximum.

He was convicted way back in 2006 by then RTC Branch 31 judge Rene Hortillo.

Espinosa appealed his conviction to the Court of Appeals. In a decision handed down on July 14, 2008, the Court of Appeals Eighteenth Division upheld the trial court’s ruling.

The case was elevated to the Supreme Court on a petition for review on certiorari. But the Supreme Court, in a Resolution dated May 30, 2011, denied the appeal for failure of petitioner Espinosa to substantially show any reversible error in the C.A. decision. The decision was declared “final and executory” by the Supreme Court on October 24, 2011.

Following judicial procedure, the case records were remanded to the Court of Appeals which in turn sent back the files to the lower court, Branch 31.

The markings on the documents show that RTC Branch 31 received the by registered mail on September 7, 2012. At the time, RTC Branch 31, along with all other courts of the RTC and Iloilo City MTC, were housed at the De Paul College campus in Jaro district as the Hall of Justice was undergoing refurbishing and repair.

The records affirming the conviction virtually vanished then, and it was only last July this year, during the conduct of an inventory of cases, that the same was noticed. Or so OIC Clerk of Court Rosenia Jover said.

For Antiquera, that explanation should not be accepted “hook, line and sinker.”

This discovery was made public only last Monday in The Daily Guardian and this blog, along with interviews with Aksyon Radyo Iloilo anchorman John Paul Tia and RMN 774 anchors Novie Guazo and Regan Arlos.

Indeed, the excuse is too shallow to be accepted. Almost every year, trial courts are mandated by the Supreme Court to conduct inventories of cases. This means RTC Branch 31 should have discovered this oversight in 2013 or 2014.

But why did it take four years?

drilon-with-kap-dabing

Monica barangay captain Keith “Dabing” Espinosa, wife of Jing Jing Espinosa, poses with the most powerful man in Iloilo City — Senator Franklin Drilon.

There are speculations that somebody powerful may have intervened to “bury” the case records, and it was only after President Rodrigo Duterte came to power that it was resurrected.

Kap dabing with drilon

VIP treatment palagi si Kap Dabing Espinosa na asawa ni Jing Jing Espinosa sa mga okasyon ni Drilon.

 

An enemy from within

There’s no mistaking the fact that the battle against illegal drugs is as difficult as repulsing a foreign invader, or even harder.
That’s because the enemy is hard to detect. The pusher is not just the street pug that was the stereotype in the past. Now even a public school teacher has been caught selling drugs. Barangay officials, too, have been nabbed in buy-bust operations. They are like the Vietcong whom the Americans had to fight half a century ago in the ricefields of Vietnam: by day ordinary farmers, by night fierce warriors.
We have to accept the reality that this battle can be waged in a rule of law setting. As we have seen time and again, drug lords and pushers can afford the best legal minds to defend them in court. And even in jail, they continue to run the illegal drugs trade with impunity.
For this alone, I am prepared to see President Duterte do it with brute force. Of course, he just has to be cautioned not to waste human lives. Just the same, the authorities should not hesitate to use force when it is deemed necessary.

Drug violence in Iloilo City

The casual manner by which a lone gunman shot and killed 58-year old Dario Duran in front of the crowded Gaisano City Capital mall in Lapaz district of Iloilo City on Tuesday afternoon sent a loud message to the entire community that drug violence is escalating. Drug lords are now starting to quarrel for territory, and they don’t care about the Comelec gun ban to enforce their wills.

This murder case isn’t a rare occurrence in Iloilo City. There have been a number of murders that have been disguised as ordinary homicides, but were actually connected to drug syndicates carrying out punitive measures against those who cross the big bosses.

One prominent case was that of a former illegal gambling bet collector in Jaro district who was shot dead a few days after police arrested drug pushers aboard a taxi operated by a suspected drug lord in Iloilo City. This happened in November last year. The victim was rumored to have been the informant who tipped off the police about taxi drivers and bet collectors as shabu couriers. He had to pay with his dear life.

Police sources say drug syndicates have recruited almost every ex-convict returning from prison terms in Bilibid. They form the army of enforcers for the drug syndicates. For the elections, they are tasked to harass, intimidate and coerce leaders of the opposition to desist from their campaign activities. And the drug syndicates have shown, as what happened at the Gaisano Capital City mall, their men simply ignore the gun ban to carry out their violent measures to assert their rule.